Broke or snowed in? Get these ingredients in your cupboard now. This is one of the most nutritious meals ever- especially the chard variation at the bottom! Makes 10 cups or more. 4 really big servings. We're calling this 5 servings.

Two recipes here- one is with hot spices or other favorites, the other is with coconut cooked chard.

1. Cook 1 cup Pearl Barley. And read this article to see how and why to incorporate barley into your diet if you aren't allergic or gluten-intolerant. It takes 3/4 of an hour but its all just simmering- no stirring or anything.

To cook pearl barley: In medium saucepan with lid, bring 3 cups water to a boil. Add 1 cup pearl barley and return to boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook 45 minutes or until barley is tender and liquid is absorbed. Makes about 3 to 3-1/2 cups.In a crock pot or slow cooker: Place 2-1/2 cups boiling water, 1 cup pearl barley and 1/2 teaspoon salt in crock pot or slow cooker. Cover and cook on HIGH for approximately 1 hour and 45 minutes.
Read more: How to Incorporate Barley Into a Diet | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2300128_incorporate-barley-diet.html#ixzz1GVRYiyKY

NOTE: Links above have problems. Here is an update 8/11: Cook barley: http://www.ehow.com/how_2210635_cook-barley.html
Incorporate barley: http://www.ehow.com/how_2282790_incorporate-whole-grains-diet.html

2. Also cook rice. 1 1/2 cups sushi rice with 2 1/4 water in covered microwave glass dish 5 minutes, let sit for 5 minutes, stir, cook 5 more minutes. Why wait? The sticky rice glue won't overflow.

3. Chop up a small habanero into 1/4 inch chunks (this is a spicy recipe with us of course. How do the mild-loving people even eat? But any very flavorful spice mixture will do. A good bet would be mild mexican seasoning or a number of Simply Organic blends. Check labels on spice packets, pick the top ingredients and make yourself.)

4. Grind 1 whole dried chipoltle pepper, 2 whole cayenne peppers, and 1 tsp of whole cumin in your dedicated spice coffee hand grinder from the resale shop ($3 or $4- there's always one for sale) which wipes out beautifully. You'll have to shake it up and down as you grind for less than 30 seconds.

5. Heat red beans in a large saucepan with spices (for us the spices are steps 3 and 4) on lowest heat until barley is done. You may need to add 1/4 cup of filtered water to the beans first and check on it. (Do you have a filter for your water? It helps get Roundup and other chemicals out of it.)

6. Add everything together, add 2 tbsp Annie's organic Worcestershire sauce simmer for a while until nice and hot.

7. Serve up with coleslaw or cabbage.

8. Freeze the rest. How long? Not sure- a while though.

When we say this is good pantry food you can make any time, how long will a can of beans, dried peppers, rice and barley keep? Not sure. A long time if stored correctly.

If you buy canned beans, rice, barley and buy dried peppers or dry them yourself and/or have spices and a bottle of organic worcestershire, you  will have food if you're snowed in or flat broke.

Variation: (this is fabulous!) boil up a can of coconut water (its in the drinks area of the store if they have natural foods) and throw in some  ripped up, beet-tastic rainbow chard or any chard for a few seconds (this is often a good deal for produce) and then stir it in after the rest. If you have enough of this, you won't need spice! This is so delicious.

Price: habanero, almost nothing. 1 1/2 cup rice and 1 cup pearl barley- $0.75 together. Can of red beans $1.25. spices and peppers- almost nothing if you have it on hand- $0.50 maybe. Prep time 15 minutes, total time 1 hour without doing anything for 45 of them but waiting. However, side of cabbage which lasts forever can be $2 bagged at Winco or a small cabbage $2 or $3- or Chard $2.50-$3 at Fred Meyer (best selection) or New Seasons (very good too). coconut water $1.50 or $2. In other words, you can add $5. that makes it $0.75 per serving.
 


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    Why recipes & tips?

    Disorientation is what we felt when we suddenly felt compelled to shop, cook and dine differently. It happens at that point you know too much to eat GMO’s. It’s probably like being an exchange student. You know a lot of the language perhaps, but there’s layers of knowledge to gain by speaking it all the time.

    Since you’re not a native speaker, you may find out after several years that a word you’ve always used isn’t quite the right one. Plus, sometimes you really need a word and you don’t know what it is- you can’t wait so you put together some phrase that pretty much means the same thing. Every day it gets easier, and by necessity you learn quickly.

    What makes it harder is our assumptions and preconceptions- even half-truths (at best) we’ve been sold. I assumed citric acid came from citrus. I assumed natural flavors would not contain GMO’s. I assumed cage-free meant chickens lived outside of cages. I assumed things like GMO fish and meat and dairy from cloned cows would be labeled and I’d know when they were on the shelves. I thought genes worked the way I learned more than a decade ago and safety tests conducted by scientists proved GMO’s were safe. The reason we have to discuss and link to all the stuff coming from regulatory agencies and scientists is that by not knowing we accidentally ate GMO’s.

    We have only our perspective to write from, and challenges we hear about others facing. By going non-GMO, you are eliminating many prepared foods or switching brands to be non-GMO or organic. When we knew too much to eat any ever again once we spotted them, we suddenly had problems eating because we had some knowledge gaps, it cost too much, we couldn’t find food, and it was taking a lot more time. For some of you, time or money added will keep you from doing it- and you might shut the door on the truth because you think you are helpless until you have more time or money. That isn’t true. It may not all be on the website yet but since we do it, we will write about it and you could always call us (email us so we know what number is yours first and pick up) and we’ll bend over backwards to give you whatever you need to make it work. We’ll go shopping with you or answer your call, text message or email in real time if you have a question at a store or restaurant or whatever you need. Until we have a lot of this up as we think of it, we’ll use a blog so the newest is easily found and you can use key words (“categories”) below. Later we’ll change this page from a random tips and recipes blog to an organized guide page.

    You will see that we didn’t know the basics, so basics are often going to be here- like our fastest best way to cook rice. Anything we know how to do or that folks suggest we pass on will be here and some will be new because they are recipes we made up. Some things only apply to going no-GMO so they might be new too. And some people live on fast food and prepared dishes and will be lost in a kitchen (we know people like that) or think they have to buy Organics because it would be awful to make non-GMO food themselves. Its not- its delightful, easy and cheap. You feel better and eat better food and food becomes an experience that brings very good feelings. I’m not a cook. I throw things together and I’m becoming good at that- so much that some of what I do might now be called cooking. Anything that is really cooking will have come from you all and we’ll post it here too so we help other cooks too. Thank you for reading.

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